Browse Titles - 90 results

Aliyale (Field Card)
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Who Angozo might have been and what he had done could not be explained, but the song was, no doubt, founded on fact, and the singing of this song would ensure publicity. "Angoza, ine ee ee, umerewo ndimwano Ambani ee-ee-ee-ee! Simudziwa mbodola ansani ee-ee!" "Angozo (man's name) you are very indiscreet. You have...
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Amacila kuwowa, Kwathu ntele (Joined) (Field Card)
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Two songs for carrying Mashila. The old practice of carrying White men, chiefs or notables about in litters has now ceased with the advent of roads and mechanical transport—but the song was sung by the father of the present singers up till about 1930, they say.
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Amama nkhawawone (Field Card)
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These two simple songs are typical of those of the older generation of musicians. The tuning of the Bango was:— 256, 236, 216, 198, 178, 156, 140 vs. Two simple songs in typical vein by a village singer.
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Amandi phikila kholowa (Field Card)
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There was once a certain man who took his wife to his home. Later on he got tired of her and she started to turn her away saying, "Go, go back to your home." "No" she said, "I must have a child before I go home and what is more you have not bought me any clothes to go dancing tsaba-tsaba." "Coka, coka nate! Ayi si...
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Amati akatambe tilawe (Field Card)
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Three Mcoma dance songs for women and girls, with 2 goblet drums, one weighted and whistles (-11.515-). "She wanted to go dancing, but she got into trouble and could not go." The girls stand in a circle and come out in pairs prancing a few steps in the centre of the circle. They retire and the next two come out u...
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Ametela metela (Field Card)
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The one stringed lute has a wooden bowl for a reasonator with a sound hole on its side. The string is strained with a peg but final tuning is achieved by means of a straining string. It is bowed by a reed or bamboo bow with spittle and the fingering is achieved by gripping the string with the inside of the second...
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Angozo (Field Card)
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The song refers to the visit, in 1953, to the Southern province of a battalion of N. Rhodesian soldiers (Wemba, wrongly called Nyakyusa by the local people, they now know) which was sent to Nyasaland to restore order after rioting had broken out. S. "Kwa Njolomolo CH. Kunabwera nkhondo ya anyachusa ayi sole memba...
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Azungu musinjilo (Field Card)
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These two simple songs are typical of those of the older generation of musicians. The tuning of the Bango was:— 256, 236, 216, 198, 178, 156, 140 vs. Two simple songs in typical vein by a village singer.
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A Yotamu amati andimange (Field Card)
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"Yotamu wanted the chief to imprison me." Note in the second song how the player sings, not in unison with his instrument, but in parallel with it. Tuning:— 792, 720, 592, 536, 476, 456, 396, 360, 296, 228. The player learnt his playing from a Nshenga at Fort Jameson called Jeremia Phiri in 1931. The apparent ov...
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Bambo Jordan: An Anthropological Narrative
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written by Bruce T. Williams (Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press, Inc., 1994, originally published 1994), 204 page(s)
written by Bruce T. Williams (Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press, Inc., 1994, originally published 1994), 204 page(s)
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