Browse Titles - 117 results

Benimana (Track)
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"May the Omwami go in peace, may he prosper and be with God." The Batwa are Pigmoids and the Cout singers were drawn from their ranks. In this instance the women were all wives of potters, pottery being one of the Twa crafts. The second song is a good example of organum singing with its incidental harmonies.
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Bolo neno kari koongo (Field Card)
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Bolo achieved an unenviable reputation for having neither shield nor ostrich feathers, and for being an uninvited guest at drinking parties. The playing of drums by these Nilotic people is usually far simpler in rhythm than that of the Bantu.
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Brunayini Fofoza (Track)
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Brunaini Khoza is a friend of the Chief Fofoza Mwamitwa and composed this song in his honour, here sung by the chief himself. The gist of the song is that without the Chief the people are likely to be in considerable distress which only his presence can dispel. "Brunai ini Makosi Fofzi ujani—na? Inamangawa hewak...
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Chapache (Field Card)
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Amongst other things they say: "You, Chief, are like a free woman, (a courtesean)" meaning "You are beautifully dressed." "I want a beast with turned down horns." The children shrugged their shoulders down, left and right alternately to imitate the horns.
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Che Chipala (Track)
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The singer comments upon the sense of justice of his chief. "Chief Chipala, he sings, knows how to settle cases."
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Chepchoni Marinda (Track)
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This lyre is strummed like a Guitar with the right hand, the left hand stopping the five strings, like the Bongwe Zither of Nyasaland. This gave two chords. Notes 1, 3, and 5 and notes 2 and 4. One string, they said, was missing, the lower octave of No. 1. The scale was: - 308, 256, 232, 206, 180, (154) vs.
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Chepkirui (Track)
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This kind of song is a favourite with the Kipsigis tribe in which they praise their friends, the countryside and other familiar things which they love.
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Chief Diutloiling wa Sebogodi and Chief Michael Bagatsu Moiloa - Lebôkô II (Field Card)
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At the time of recording this village was much divided on account of the political questions of the continuity of the chieftainship. One acting Chief had been deposed and was living in Bechuanaland and another chief was acting in his place. The speaker who composed and read the praises of his elder brother, the pr...
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Chief Diutloiling wa Sebogodi and Chief Michael Bagatsu Moiloa - Lebôkô II (Track)
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At the time of recording this village was much divided on account of the political questions of the continuity of the chieftainship. One acting Chief had been deposed and was living in Bechuanaland and another chief was acting in his place. The speaker who composed and read the praises of his elder brother, the pr...
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Chomusikana Mandega I (Field Card)
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Physical training at this school was done to the accompaniment of several well-known folk songs. The team of boys was supplied with dumbbells made of Blue Gum wood which they clap together. The drummer and song leader stand in front of the class setting the pace. The whole is converted into a kind of dance routine...
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