16 results for your search

Beyond the Miracle Worker
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written by Kim E. Nielsen, fl. 2009 (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 2009), 321 page(s)
The first biography to unearth the fascinating relationship between Anne Sullivan Macy and Helen Keller. After many years, historian and Helen Keller expert Kim Nielsen realized that she, along with other historians and biographers, had failed Anne Sullivan Macy. While Macy is remembered primarily as Helen Keller..
written by Kim E. Nielsen, fl. 2009 (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 2009), 321 page(s)
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Blind Rage: Letters to Helen Keller
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written by Georgina Kleege, 1956- (District of Columbia: Gallaudet University Press, 2006, originally published 2006), 224 page(s)
As a young blind girl, Georgina Kleege repeatedly heard the refrain, “Why can’t you be more like Helen Keller?” Kleege’s resentment culminates in her book Blind Rage: Letters to Helen Keller, an ingenious examination of the life of this renowned international figure using 21st-century sensibilities. Kleege...
written by Georgina Kleege, 1956- (District of Columbia: Gallaudet University Press, 2006, originally published 2006), 224 page(s)
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Byline of Hope: The Newspaper and Magazine Writing of Helen Keller
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written by Beth A. Haller, fl. 1998 (Louisville, KY: Advocado Press, 2015), 347 page(s)
Helen Keller -- star of an early silent film, vaudevillian, suffragist, controversial proponent of eugenics -- was first and foremost a writer. Byline of Hope is the first book to collect Keller's journalism — much of it never before reprinted. In articles for Good Housekeeping, Ladies' Home Journal, The Atlanti...
written by Beth A. Haller, fl. 1998 (Louisville, KY: Advocado Press, 2015), 347 page(s)
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7. The Early Twentieth Century: Helen Keller and the Public Reception of Disability
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written by Sara Newman, fl. 2013; in Writing Disability: A Critical History, Disability in Society (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2013, originally published 2013), 141-164
What accounts for the differing ways that individuals and cultures have tried to make sense of mental and physical disabilities? Can we see a pattern of change over time? Sara Newman examines personal narratives across a broad sweep of history—from ancient Greece to the present day—to reveal the interplay of d...
written by Sara Newman, fl. 2013; in Writing Disability: A Critical History, Disability in Society (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2013, originally published 2013), 141-164
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Helen Keller & the FBI
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written by Fred Pelka, fl. 1986; edited by Mary Johnson, fl. 1980; in Ragged Edge, Vol. 22, No. 5, 2001, Ragged Edge, Vol. 22, No. 5, 2001 (Louisville, KY: Advocado Press, 2001), 19-22
The Ragged Edge (formerly The Disability Rag & ReSource) offers the best in today’s writing about society’s 'ragged edge' issues: medical rationing, genetic discrimination, assisted suicide, long-term care, attendant services, and more.
written by Fred Pelka, fl. 1986; edited by Mary Johnson, fl. 1980; in Ragged Edge, Vol. 22, No. 5, 2001, Ragged Edge, Vol. 22, No. 5, 2001 (Louisville, KY: Advocado Press, 2001), 19-22
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Chapter Two. Seeing by Touch, Hearing by Sign
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written by Frieda Zames, 1932-2005 and Doris Zames Fleischer, fl. 2001; in The Disability Rights Movement: From Charity to Confrontation (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 2011, originally published 2001), 51-69
Based on interviews with almost a hundred activists, this book provides a detailed history of the struggle for disability rights in the United States. It is a complex story of shifts in consciousness and shifts in policy, of changing focuses on particular disabilities such as blindness, deafness, polio, quadripleg...
written by Frieda Zames, 1932-2005 and Doris Zames Fleischer, fl. 2001; in The Disability Rights Movement: From Charity to Confrontation (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 2011, originally published 2001), 51-69
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CHAPTER 31: Blindness and Visual Culture: An Eyewitness Account
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written by Georgina Kleege, 1956-; in The Disability Studies ReaderThe Disability Studies Reader (Fifth Edition) (New York, NY: Routledge (Publisher), 2017, originally published 1997), 457-466
The fifth edition of The Disability Studies Reader addresses the post-identity theoretical landscape by emphasizing questions of interdependency and independence, the human-animal relationship, and issues around the construction or materiality of gender, the body, and sexuality. Selections explore the underlying b...
written by Georgina Kleege, 1956-; in The Disability Studies ReaderThe Disability Studies Reader (Fifth Edition) (New York, NY: Routledge (Publisher), 2017, originally published 1997), 457-466
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Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) and Helen Keller in 1936
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(1936) (New York, NY: Bridgeman Art Library), 1 page(s)
A black-and-white photograph of Helen Keller, who was born blind, deaf, and mute, and Eleanor Roosevelt, the president’s wife, from 1936. Keller and Roosevelt, both dressed in evening clothes, are standing next to each other, with Roosevelt holding Keller’s hand.
(1936) (New York, NY: Bridgeman Art Library), 1 page(s)
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Helen Keller (1880 - 1968) born blind deaf mute, thanks to her governess Miss Macy she overcame this handicaps, studied and created in 1921 the American foundation for the blind, here c. 1920
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(1920) (New York, NY: Bridgeman Art Library), 1 page(s)
A black-and-white photograph of Helen Keller, who was born blind, deaf, and mute, and her teacher, Anne Sulllivan Macy. Keller and Macy are seated next to each other in a room, with Keller holding Macy’s hand.
(1920) (New York, NY: Bridgeman Art Library), 1 page(s)
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Helen Keller, 1893 (b/w photo)
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(1893) , 1 page(s)
Black-and-white photo portrait of Helen Keller, age 13, seated in profile and wearing a white, lace dress with small flowers tucked into the bodice.
(1893) , 1 page(s)
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