Playlist:  Stereotypes of Indians in Brazil by Jenna Makowski, Alexander Street Press

Surveys undertaken across major Brazilian urban centers reveal that negative, simplistic and patronizing stereotypes of indigenous communities persist in mainstream society. Here, Brazil's Indians speak out against those stereotypes in their own words.
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Distance Between White And Indian Communities: A Yanomami Perspective (Indians in Brazil: Who Are They?)
written by Vincent Carelli, 1953-; directed by Vincent Carelli, 1953-, in Video in the Villages (Watertown, MA: Documentary Educational Resources (DER), 2000), 18 mins  
From the mainstream Brazilian perspective, Indians are primitive, behave like animals, and threaten white populations. That's the stereotype embedded in the school systems. However, according to Davi Kopenawa (Yanomami), Indians are instead reacting to white aggression and disease by purposefully maintaining distance.
02:06
4 Apr 2014
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Mainstream Prejudices Against Indians: A Kaingang Perspective (Indians in Brazil: Who Are They?)
written by Vincent Carelli, 1953-; directed by Vincent Carelli, 1953-, in Video in the Villages (Watertown, MA: Documentary Educational Resources (DER), 2000), 18 mins  
Prejudices against Indians run rampant in mainstream Brazil society, with many perceiving Indians to be lazy, primitive, greedy, and less-than-human. According to Azilene Inacio (Kaingang), who received her degree in Sociology from the Catholic University of Parana, much of that stereotype comes from the fights Indians are putting up to get their land back.
02:27
4 Apr 2014
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Images of Indians in Popular Culture: A Baniwa Perspective (Indians in Brazil: Who Are They?)
written by Vincent Carelli, 1953-; directed by Vincent Carelli, 1953-, in Video in the Villages (Watertown, MA: Documentary Educational Resources (DER), 2000), 18 mins  
Mainstream Brazilians have a superficial image of what an Indian should look like, characterized by nose rings and headdresses; This is glossing over the depth of culture in tribes like the Maxacali, who have interacted with white men for 3 centuries but still maintain their own language and culture. When this stereotype is broken, for example, by natives who live in major cities or own cars, they are no longer deemed "Indian". Bonifacio Jose (Baniwa) reasons, however, that Indians retain their ethnicity regardless of where they are or how they live.
03:38
4 Apr 2014
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Are Indians Dying Out in Brazil? A Kaingang Perspective (Indians in Brazil: Who Are They?)
written by Vincent Carelli, 1953-; directed by Vincent Carelli, 1953-, in Video in the Villages (Watertown, MA: Documentary Educational Resources (DER), 2000), 18 mins  
While mainstream culture labels Indians as a dying breed, Azilene Inacio (Kaingang) maintains that will never happen. Not only has the native population of Brazil doubled in the last 50 years, Indians will still continue to self-identify as such regardless of how and where they live.
02:37
4 Apr 2014
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