Playlist:  Traditional Irish Music (Introduction to World Music: Europe) by Jenna Makowski, Alexander Street Press

The goal of this playlist is to introduce listeners to different types of traditional Irish tunes, including jigs, reels and hornpipes. Listeners should be able to distinguish between them based on meter and rhythm. Traditional Irish instruments are also introduced, as well as variations of Irish music on an international stage.
Format
Artwork
Title
Notes
Duration / Pages
Date added
 
Exile /Ships Are Sailing /My Love Is in America [Jig]
performed by Golden Bough; in Jigs, Reels & Hornpipes from Ireland (ARC Music Productions, 2009), 5 mins  
The term "jig" probably derived from the French "giguer" - to leap or to gambol. It was known as a dance in 16th century England. Irish jigs can be either regular or irregular in structure and are placed in double time - each section is repeated. The music is in 6/8 time. Listen for the homophonic textures, each instrument contributing to the melody and ornamentation. (Jigs, Reels & Hornpipes from Ireland. Liner Notes. American Record Corporation, 2009.)
04:33
26 Dec 2013
Scholar/Caledonian [Reels]
performed by Kieran Fahy, fl. 1979; in Jigs, Reels & Hornpipes from Ireland (ARC Music Productions, 2009), 3 mins  
The reel is a folk dance originating from Scotland. It was introduced to Ireland during the second half of the 18th century. Today it is danced by both men and women. The music is in 4/4 time at a relatively fast tempo. Women typically dance with soft shoes, men often with hard shoes. (Jigs, Reels & Hornpipes from Ireland. Liner Notes. American Record Corporation, 2009.)
03:04
26 Dec 2013
Hornpipes
performed by Noel McLoughlin, 1955-; in Jigs, Reels & Hornpipes from Ireland (ARC Music Productions, 2009), 4 mins  
The name is often assumed to have derived from the instrument that is supposed to have performed the music. The dance is said to have begun around the 16th century on English sailing ships. In Ireland, where the dance is not indigenous, it has been developed to championship standard. While originally being danced by men only, it is now performed by both sexes. The music is in 4/4 time, almost like a slow reel. (Jigs, Reels & Hornpipes from Ireland. Liner Notes. American Record Corporation, 2009.)
03:47
26 Dec 2013
Blast of Wind/Hills of Ireland [Slip Jig]
performed by Florie Brown; in Jigs, Reels & Hornpipes from Ireland (ARC Music Productions, 2009), 2 mins  
A slip jig is a type of jig in 9/8 time, each bar consisting of three groups of triplets. The slip jig is danced in soft shoes, by women only, and is the most graceful of Irish dances. (Jigs, Reels & Hornpipes from Ireland. Liner Notes. American Record Corporation, 2009.)
02:23
26 Dec 2013
Riverdance
composed by Bill Whelan, 1950-; conducted by Proinnsías O'Duinn and Michael McGlynn; performed by Bill Whelan, 1950-, Anúna; in Riverdance: Music From The Show (Decca Records, 2005), 6 mins  
Traditional Irish music and dance gained popularity on an international stage after a performance of Riverdance during the Eurovision Song Contest. It is an example of a local music style globalized. (Riverdance: Music from the Show. Decca Records, 2005.)
05:42
26 Dec 2013
Banish Misfortune/ Ard an Bhothair/ Idle Road
performed by Jean-Yves Le Pape, fl. 1999, Jean-Marc Lesieur, fl. 1999 and Jacques Portal, fl. 1999; in Jean-Yves Le Pape: Irish Uilleann Pipes (ARC Music Productions, 2010), 4 mins  
Unlike the Scottish Bagpipes, which require breath from the lungs, the Irish Uilleann pipes are pumped with the arm. Smaller and (slightly) quieter than the Scottish version, Uilleann pipes are played as solo instruments and in Irish ensembles. Listen for characteristics common to traditional Irish tunes here, including an ornamented melody. (Jean-Yves Le Pape: Irish Uilleann Pipes. Liner Notes. American Record Corporation, 2010.)
04:17
26 Dec 2013
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