Voices of the Survivors: Testimony, Mourning, and Memory in Post-Dictatorship Argentina, 1983-1995

Voices of the Survivors: Testimony, Mourning, and Memory in Post-Dictatorship Argentina, 1983-1995

written by Liria Evangelista, fl. 1998, in Latin American Studies, Vol. 13 (New York, NY: Garland Science, 1998, originally published 1998), 166 page(s)

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Abstract / Summary
By blending personal memoir and critical analysis, "Voices of the Survivors "explores cultural and human responses to the violence of political repression and social disintegration perpetrated in Argentina during the so called "Dirty War" of the late '70s and early '80s. Central to the theoretical and critical corpus is the work of scholars writing in response to the historical trauma of the Holocaust (Adorno, La Capra, Shoshana Felman), which posed questions regarding social trauma, the links between mourning and memory, and the role of artistic creation and its value as testimony.
Field of Interest
Global Issues
Author
Liria Evangelista, fl. 1998
Publisher
Garland Publishing
Copyright Message
Copyright © 1998 by Liria Evangelista
Content Type
Book
Warning: Contains explicit content
No
Format
Text
Original Publication Date
1998
Page Count
166
Publication Year
1998
Publisher
Garland Science
Place Published / Released
New York, NY
Series Number
Vol. 13
Subject
Global Issues, Social Sciences, Individual and Groups Rights, Argentina’s Dirty War (1969-1983), State-sponsored violence, Argentine Dirty War, 1976-1983, History, The Arts, Direitos Individuais e de Grupo, Derechos del Individuo y de Grupos, Argentina, Argentines, 20th Century in World History (1914--2000)
Translator
Renzo Llorente, fl. 1998
Series / Program
Latin American Studies
Keywords and Translated Subjects
Direitos Individuais e de Grupo, Derechos del Individuo y de Grupos

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