Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights, The Witnesses: War Crimes and the Promise of Justice in The Hague

Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights, The Witnesses: War Crimes and the Promise of Justice in The Hague

written by Eric Stover, fl. 1996, in Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007), 248 page(s)

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Abstract / Summary
In recent years, the world community has demonstrated a renewed commitment to the pursuit of international criminal justice. In 1993, the United Nations established two ad hoc international tribunals to try those responsible for genocide and crimes against humanity in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. Ten years later, the International Criminal Court began its operations and is developing prosecutions in its first two cases (Congo and Uganda). Meanwhile, national and hybrid war crimes tribunals have been established in Sierra Leone, Kosovo, Serbia and Montenegro, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, East Timor, Indonesia, Iraq, and Cambodia.Thousands of people have given testimony before these courts. Most have witnessed war crimes, including mass killings, torture, rape, inhumane imprisonment, forced expulsion, and the destruction of homes and villages. For many, testifying in a war crimes trial requires great courage, especially as they are well aware that war criminals still walk the streets of their villages and towns. Yet despite these risks, little attention has been paid to the fate of witnesses of mass atrocity. Nor do we know much about their experiences testifying before an international tribunal or the effect of such testimony on their return to their postwar communities. The first study of victims and witnesses who have testified before an international war crimes tribunal, The Witnesses examines the opinions and attitudes of eighty-seven individuals—Bosnians, Muslims, Serbs, and Croats—who have appeared before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.Eric Stover is Faculty Director of the Human Rights Center and Adjunct Professor of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of numerous books, including Witnesses from the Grave: The Stories Bones Tell (with Christopher Joyce), and editor of The Breaking of Bodies and Minds: Torture, Psychiatric Abuse, and the Health Professions (with Elena O. Nightingale).
Field of Interest
Global Issues
Author
Eric Stover, fl. 1996
Copyright Message
Copyright © 2005, by University of Pennsylvania Press
Content Type
Book
Duration
0 sec
Warning: Contains explicit content
No
Format
Text
Page Count
248
Publication Year
2007
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Place Published / Released
Philadelphia, PA
Subject
Global Issues, Social Sciences, Transitional Justice, General Context: Human Rights Violations, War Crimes, Crimes against Humanity, Genocide, Legal testimony, Witnesses, War crimes tribunals, International justice, Yugoslav Wars, 1992-1995, Sociology, Law, Justicia Transicional, Justiça Transicional, República Federal de Yugoslavia, República Federal da Lugoslávia, República Federal da Jugoslávia, Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Historical Place), The Hague, Den Haag, 's-Gravenhage, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Historical Place), Hague, South Holland, Croatians, Serbians, Bosnians, 21st Century in World History (2001– ), 20th Century in World History (1914--2000)
Series / Program
Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights
Keywords and Translated Subjects
Justicia Transicional, Justiça Transicional, República Federal de Yugoslavia, República Federal da Lugoslávia, República Federal da Jugoslávia, Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Historical Place), The Hague, Den Haag, 's-Gravenhage

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