Harsh Justice: Criminal Punishment and the Widening Divide Between America and Europe

Harsh Justice: Criminal Punishment and the Widening Divide Between America and Europe

written by James Q. Whitman, 1957- (Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 2003), 322 page(s)

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Abstract / Summary
Criminal justice in America is harsh and degrading when compared to other countries in the West. By contrast, France and Germany are systematically mild. Whitman suggests that the difference results from America's non-hierarchical social system and distrust of state power.
Field of Interest
Global Issues
Author
James Q. Whitman, 1957-
Copyright Message
Copyright © 2003 Oxford University Press
Content Type
Book
Duration
0 sec
Warning: Contains explicit content
No
Format
Text
Page Count
322
Publication Year
2003
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Place Published / Released
Oxford, England
Subject
Global Issues, Criminal Justice & Public Safety, Social Sciences, Customary International Law, Human Rights and Public Health, Administration of Justice, Law Enforcement, Corrections, General Context and History of Prison, Philosophy, Criminal punishment, Law, Politics & Policy, Direito Internacional Consuetudin‡rio, Derecho Internacional Consuetudinario, Derechos Humanos y Sanidad Pública, Direitos Humanos e Saúde Pública, Administração da Justiça, Administración de Justicia, Alemania, Alemanha, Deutschland, Francia, França, United States of America, USA, US of A, America, Estados Unidos, Germany, France, United States
Keywords and Translated Subjects
Direito Internacional Consuetudin‡rio, Derecho Internacional Consuetudinario, Derechos Humanos y Sanidad Pública, Direitos Humanos e Saúde Pública, Administração da Justiça, Administración de Justicia, Alemania, Alemanha, Deutschland, Francia, França, United States of America, USA, US of A, America, Estados Unidos

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