How Did White Southern Churchwomen Use Their Race, Gender, and Faith in the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1945-1968?

How Did White Southern Churchwomen Use Their Race, Gender, and Faith in the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1945-1968?

written by Edith Holbrook Riehm, fl. 2008 (Alexandria, VA: Alexander Street, 2008),
Source: documents.alexanderstreet.com

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Details

Field of Interest
Women and Social Movements
Author
Edith Holbrook Riehm, fl. 2008
Collection
Women and Social Movements in the United States,1600-2000
Content Type
Document project
Warning: Contains explicit content
No
Format
Related Web resources
URL
https://documents.alexanderstreet.com/node/79
Publication Year
2008
Publisher
Alexander Street
Place Published / Released
Alexandria, VA
Subject
Women and Social Movements, History, Women and Rights, Women and Religion, Religious faiths, Race relations, Civil rights, Mujer y Derechos, Direitos da Mulher, Mujer y Religión, Mulher e Religião, Southern Regional Council, Fellowship of the Concerned, Atlanta, GA, Civil Rights Movement, Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching, Dorothy Rogers Tilly, 1883-1970, Women of Color, Women and Religion, Race Discrimination, Religious Leadership and Religious Activism, Depression & World War II (1929–1945), Post-war Era (1945–1960), The Sixties (1960–1974), 20th Century in World History (1914--2000)
Topic
Race Discrimination, Religious Leadership and Religious Activism
Keywords and Translated Subjects
Mujer y Derechos, Direitos da Mulher, Mujer y Religión, Mulher e Religião

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