Labor History: Furniture Workers

Labor History: Furniture Workers

(California: California State University, Long Beach. Virtual Oral/Aural History Archive),
Source: csulb-dspace.calstate.edu

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Abstract / Summary
Mexicans first gained employment in the furniture industry in the late 1910s. While it is unclear whether they were primarily U.S. citizens or immigrants, it is clear that they were often restricted to low-paying, undesirable jobs. By 1925, when Los Angeles had become the nation's fourth largest furniture manufacturing center, more entry-level Mexican workers were hired and the experienced ones were assigned to more skilled occupations. Nevertheless, the racially segmented job classifications and pay scales remained intact.
Field of Interest
Letters and Diaries
Content Type
Oral history
Format
Related Web resources
URL
https://csulb-dspace.calstate.edu/handle/10211.3/206609
Publisher
California State University, Long Beach. Virtual Oral/Aural History Archive
Place Published / Released
California
Subject
Letters and Diaries, History, Economics, Ethnic groups, Labor force, Great Depression, 1929-1941, World War II, 1939-1945, United States of America, USA, US of A, America, Estados Unidos, California, Los Angeles, CA, North America, United States
Keywords and Translated Subjects
United States of America, USA, US of A, America, Estados Unidos

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