Browse Experiment - 11 results

18: WALTER MISCHEL AND SELF-CONTROL
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with Douglas Mook; in Classic Experiments in Psychology (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2004, originally published 2004), 121-124
with Douglas Mook; in Classic Experiments in Psychology (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2004, originally published 2004), 121-124
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Delay of Gratification, Need for Achievement, and Acquiescence In Another Culture
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with Walter Mischel, 1930-, in Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, Vol. 62 no. 3, 1961, pp. 543-552 (Albany, NY: Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1961, originally published 1961), 10 page(s)
with Walter Mischel, 1930-, in Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, Vol. 62 no. 3, 1961, pp. 543-552 (Albany, NY: Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1961, originally published 1961), 10 page(s)
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Delayed gratification and ego development: implications for clinical and experimental research
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with Jerome L. Singer, in Journal of Consulting Psychology, Vol. 19 no. 4, August 1955, pp. 259-256 (District of Columbia: American Psychological Association and Journal of Consulting Psychology, 1955, originally published 1955), 8 page(s)
with Jerome L. Singer, in Journal of Consulting Psychology, Vol. 19 no. 4, August 1955, pp. 259-256 (District of Columbia: American Psychological Association and Journal of Consulting Psychology, 1955, originally published 1955), 8 page(s)
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Don't eat the marshmallow
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(2009),
Source: www.ted.com
In this short talk from TED U, Joachim de Posada shares a landmark experiment on delayed gratification -- and how it can predict future success. With priceless video of kids trying their hardest not to eat the marshmallow.
(2009),
Source: www.ted.com
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Examining 'The Marshmallow Test'
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(Columbia Broadcasting System, 2010),
Source: www.youtube.com
Katie Couric speaks with author, Ellen Galinsky about the "marshmallow test" and what it says about your child's ability to pursue future goals.
(Columbia Broadcasting System, 2010),
Source: www.youtube.com
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Father-Absence and Delay of Gratification: Cross-Cultural Comparisons
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with Walter Mischel, 1930-, in The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, Vol. 63 no. 1, July 1961, pp. 116-124 (District of Columbia: American Psychological Association and Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1961, originally published 1961), 9 page(s)
with Walter Mischel, 1930-, in The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, Vol. 63 no. 1, July 1961, pp. 116-124 (District of Columbia: American Psychological Association and Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1961, originally published 1961), 9 page(s)
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The Marshmallow Experiment - Instant Gratification
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(2010),
Source: www.youtube.com
We ran a duplicate of Stanford University's "Marshmallow Experiment" with our own Flood kids (Google it for the details).
(2010),
Source: www.youtube.com
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Preference for Delayed Reinforcement and Social Responsibilities
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with Walter Mischel, 1930-, in The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, Vol. 62 no. 1, January 1961, pp. 1-7 (District of Columbia: American Psychological Association and Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1961, originally published 1961), 7 page(s)
with Walter Mischel, 1930-, in The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, Vol. 62 no. 1, January 1961, pp. 1-7 (District of Columbia: American Psychological Association and Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1961, originally published 1961), 7 page(s)
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Prudential: Overcoming Temptation
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(2013),
Source: www.youtube.com
Temptation is everywhere. But if we can just show a little restraint, we can enjoy much greater rewards in the future. Can we do it? We did a little experiment to find out.
(2013),
Source: www.youtube.com
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The psychology of time
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(2009),
Source: www.ted.com
Psychologist Philip Zimbardo says happiness and success are rooted in a trait most of us disregard: the way we orient toward the past, present and future. He suggests we calibrate our outlook on time as a first step to improving our lives.
(2009),
Source: www.ted.com
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