Browse Organizations

Displaying 1 - 25 of 27
Starts with A|C|D|E|I|J|N|R|T|W|Y
Namesort descending Description Founding year Works by Works about Works to
All India Women's Conference In January 1927, the first All India Women’s Conference (AIWC) focused on women’s education and met at Pune. It was founded on the principles of social justice and of equality for women and girls in India. It is... In January 1927, the first All India Women’s Conference (AIWC) focused on women’s education and met at Pune. It was founded on the principles of social justice and of equality for women and girls in India. It is affiliated with the International Alliance of Women (IAW) and the Pan Pacific and Southeast Asia Women’s Association (PPSEAWA). Women and Social Movements International (WASI) includes documents related to early conferences. Show more Show less 1927 6 7
American Association of University Women The American Association of University Women (AAUW) was founded in 1881 and today numbers over 100,000 members in the U. S. Local branches at the turn of the twentieth century focused on improving educational opport... The American Association of University Women (AAUW) was founded in 1881 and today numbers over 100,000 members in the U. S. Local branches at the turn of the twentieth century focused on improving educational opportunities. Today the association continues to promote education, address current political issues, and work with with similar international organizations. Show more Show less 1881 2 2
American Civil Liberties Union The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) was founded in 1920 to protect personal freedoms guaranteed by the Bill of Rights. It grew out of a group that opposed U.S. participation in World War I and defended the rig... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) was founded in 1920 to protect personal freedoms guaranteed by the Bill of Rights. It grew out of a group that opposed U.S. participation in World War I and defended the rights of immigrants. Show more Show less 1920 1
Arab Women's Solidarity Association Nawal El Saadawi founded the Arab Women's Solidarity Association (AWSA) in Egypt in 1982. The organization promotes the rights of Arab women as part of the process of liberating Arab people, and promotes women's par... Nawal El Saadawi founded the Arab Women's Solidarity Association (AWSA) in Egypt in 1982. The organization promotes the rights of Arab women as part of the process of liberating Arab people, and promotes women's participation in social, economic, cultural and political life. Women and Social Movements International includes papers and proceedings of AWSA conferences as well as publications by Nawal El Saadawi. Show more Show less 1982 4 3
Associated Country Women of the World The Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is an organization of rural women. It aims to raise the standard of living for rural women and their families, to provide rural women practical support to generate in... The Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is an organization of rural women. It aims to raise the standard of living for rural women and their families, to provide rural women practical support to generate income, and to speak on behalf of rural women through affiliation with the United Nations and its agencies. Its roots extend into the late 19th century with the formation of independent rural women’s groups in several countries. In April 1929, the first International Conference of Rural Women, representing 24 countries, met in London. In 1930, the International Council of Women (ICW) created a liaison committee of rural women’s organizations; the committee became the ACWW at Stockholm in 1933. Since 1936 it has held 23 triennial conferences with additional regional meetings. In 2010 its membership included 365 affiliated societies in over 70 countries. The ACWW does not receive governmental monetary support. It runs programs to promote health, sanitation, subsistence production, education, business skills and nutrition, among other interests. The materials in the digital archive include proceedings from the triennial conferences, and several institutional publications that include histories of the organization. Show more Show less 1933 38 44
Association for Women's Rights in Development The Association for Women in Development (AWID) was founded in 1982 to generate discussion among professionals on the impact of economic development efforts on women. In recent years, AWID has broadened its mission... The Association for Women in Development (AWID) was founded in 1982 to generate discussion among professionals on the impact of economic development efforts on women. In recent years, AWID has broadened its mission to advocate equality, peace, and women's human rights and has changed its original name to reflect this broadened mission. Documents from AWID in Women and Social Movements International include a number of recent online publications from the Association's web site. Show more Show less 1982 4
Committee of Correspondence Founded in 1953 and based in New York City, the Committee of Correspondence served as a clearinghouse of information for the development of leadership skills among women in newly independent countries. The Committee... Founded in 1953 and based in New York City, the Committee of Correspondence served as a clearinghouse of information for the development of leadership skills among women in newly independent countries. The Committee distributed monthly bulletins internationally with information on subjects such as child welfare, community development, education, social welfare, the status of women and women in public life. The Committee supported field workers in over 100 countries and offered training for more than 5,000 women.

[From the collection description at the Sophia Smith Collection:] Despite the Committee's successes at promoting contacts among women's organizations and hosting conferences both in and out of the United States, it could not recover from revelations published in Ramparts magazine in 1967 that it was among the international organizations covertly funded by the Central Intelligence Agency. Supportive of the Committee's commitment to liberal anti-communism, the CIA had funneled funding for the Committee through private foundation grants. After the expose in Ramparts, which was further publicized in a series of New York Times articles, President Lyndon Johnson curtailed CIA funding of private foundations. Unable to fill the breach through traditional fundraising methods, the Committee of Correspondence elected to dissolve in 1969.

Women and Social Movements International includes manuscript reports and letters circulated by Committee women in the course of their international work.
Show more Show less
1952 15 55 11
Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN) was founded in 1984 in Bangalore, India, at a meeting of women, including Devaki Jain from India and Peggy Antrobus from Barbados, concerned with the effects... Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN) was founded in 1984 in Bangalore, India, at a meeting of women, including Devaki Jain from India and Peggy Antrobus from Barbados, concerned with the effects of development policies on women. The group sought to identify and support alternative development strategies. They presented a report to the 1985 UN Conference on Women held in Nairobi. DAWN is a feminist organization that analyzes and fights against economic, social, and political processes that cause inequality in the global south. DAWN materials in this digital archive include reports from conferences and studies on development and related issues. Show more Show less 1984 4 15
Egyptian Feminist Union Veiled Egyptian women publicly protested British occupation in 1919, and four years later Hoda Sha'arawi organized the Egyptian Feminist Union (EFU) and affiliated with the International Woman Suffrage Alliance (IWS... Veiled Egyptian women publicly protested British occupation in 1919, and four years later Hoda Sha'arawi organized the Egyptian Feminist Union (EFU) and affiliated with the International Woman Suffrage Alliance (IWSA). The women of the Union focused on women's political rights as well as education, anti-prostitution, and opposition to marriage/divorce laws discriminating against women. In 1938, the EFU held the First Congress of Arab Women in Cairo, focusing on issues related to Palestine. The Second Congress in 1944 created the Pan-Arab Women's League. In 1966, the EFU changed its name to the Hoda Sha'arawi Association. Women and Social Movements International includes numerous documents related to the EFU's international activities, primarily articles from their monthly French-language journal, L'Egyptienne, reporting on the EFU's participation in international women's conferences in the 1920's and 30s. Show more Show less 1923 2 7
International Committee of Women for Permanent Peace The International Committee of Women for Permanent Peace grew out of the April 1915 International Congress of Women held in The Hague, Netherlands, to discuss ways to end World War I and achieve world peace. In 1919... The International Committee of Women for Permanent Peace grew out of the April 1915 International Congress of Women held in The Hague, Netherlands, to discuss ways to end World War I and achieve world peace. In 1919 the International Committee renamed itself the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. Show more Show less 1915 2
International Council of Women of the Darker Races In 1922 African American educator and club-woman Margaret Murray Washington of Tuskegee Institute founded the International Council of Women of the Darker Races. The organization dedicated itself to studying the sta... In 1922 African American educator and club-woman Margaret Murray Washington of Tuskegee Institute founded the International Council of Women of the Darker Races. The organization dedicated itself to studying the status of women and children of color around the world, but primarily focused on women of the African diaspora. The group was small and elite throughout its history. Membership peaked at about 40. Members included such prominent activists as Addie Hunton, Mary McLeod Bethune, Addie Dickerson, Nannie Helen Burroughs, and Maggie L. Walker. Most members hailed from the United States, though there were a few members from Africa and the Caribbean. The ICWDR took an active interest in the women’s peace movement throughout most of its history. In 1924 they helped fund a girls’ school in Sierra Leone. The ICWDR also took an active interest in U.S. involvement in Haiti and Ethiopia in the 1920s and 1930s. Washington, Hunton, and Dickerson served terms as the organization’s presidents. The ICWDR did not maintain a central office and thus did not leave a substantial archive documenting its history. The database draws together documents from the personal papers of several active members and a few newspapers. Most of the materials consist of correspondence. Also included are a constitution, some meeting minutes, and a report of one of the group’s early meetings. Show more Show less 1920 1 10
International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union Founded in 1900, the International Ladies Garment Workers Union (ILGWU) initially represented a largely immigrant workforce. The ILGWU and the women within the union gained significant strength during the 1909 shirt... Founded in 1900, the International Ladies Garment Workers Union (ILGWU) initially represented a largely immigrant workforce. The ILGWU and the women within the union gained significant strength during the 1909 shirtwaist strike. Throughout its history the ILGWU was a dominant force in the American labor movement with branches around the country. The Union became part of the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees (UNITE) in 1995. Show more Show less 1900 1
Josephine Butler Society The Association for Moral and Social Hygiene (AMSH) carried out the work of Josephine Butler (1828-1906), who organized to end state regulation of prostitution and the stigmatization of prostitutes. The AMSH was a B... The Association for Moral and Social Hygiene (AMSH) carried out the work of Josephine Butler (1828-1906), who organized to end state regulation of prostitution and the stigmatization of prostitutes. The AMSH was a British affiliate of the International Abolitionist Federation (IAF). In 1962, the AMSH merged into the Josephine Butler Society. Women and Social Movements International includes material related to the group's work on international prostitution and trafficking issues. Show more Show less 1915 1 1
National American Woman Suffrage Association In 1890 the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA), led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, joined Lucy Stone’s American Woman’s Suffrage Association (AWSA) to form the National American Woman Su... In 1890 the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA), led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, joined Lucy Stone’s American Woman’s Suffrage Association (AWSA) to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). The suffrage movement had split in 1869 over the issue of black male suffrage in the Fifteenth Amendment. From 1890 to 1920 when woman suffrage was finally added to the U.S. Constitution, NAWSA was the dominant national suffrage organization. Show more Show less 1890 2 5
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People In 1909 W.E.B. Du Bois, other participants in the Niagara Movement, women activists including Mary Church Terrell and Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and other African-American critics of Booker T. Washington united with whit... In 1909 W.E.B. Du Bois, other participants in the Niagara Movement, women activists including Mary Church Terrell and Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and other African-American critics of Booker T. Washington united with white supporters to form the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Still an important representative of African American interests, the NAACP has a long history of defending and expanding black civil rights. Show more Show less 1909 1
National Council of Women of the United States The National Council of Women (NCW) was founded in 1888 as the national section of the International Council of Women. The NCW aimed to "promote the welfare of all women of the country" and became an umbrella organi... The National Council of Women (NCW) was founded in 1888 as the national section of the International Council of Women. The NCW aimed to "promote the welfare of all women of the country" and became an umbrella organization for numerous women’s organizations including the American Association of University Women and the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. Show more Show less 1888 7
National League of Women Voters The League of Women Voters (LWV) is a United States nonpartisan organization that formed out of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) in 1920. In addition to a domestic focus on voter education, t... The League of Women Voters (LWV) is a United States nonpartisan organization that formed out of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) in 1920. In addition to a domestic focus on voter education, the LWV developed international committees to address foreign affairs. In its early years, the LWV established the Department of International Cooperation to Prevent War, which focused on peace work. In 1947 it set up the Carrie Chapman Catt Memorial Fund to provide civic education to women whose countries were transitioning to democratic governments. The name of the Memorial Fund changed to the Overseas Education Fund (OEF) in 1961 and OEF International in 1986. This digital archive includes selected international material from the Department of International Cooperation in the 1920s and 1930s and OEF International material from the 1940s to the 1990s. Show more Show less 1919 12 19
National Woman Suffrage Association Founded by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony after the demise of the American Equal Rights Association, this woman suffrage organization supported a wide range of women's rights issues. Led by an all-women... Founded by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony after the demise of the American Equal Rights Association, this woman suffrage organization supported a wide range of women's rights issues. Led by an all-women slate of officers, the Association promoted a conscious strategy of organizing women independently of male-dominated political parties. Competition between the National and the American Woman Suffrage Association (see above) divided the woman suffrage movement until the two organizations merged in 1890. Show more Show less 1869 1
National Woman's Party, US In 1916 Alice Paul, founder of the militant suffragist organization, the Congressional Union of Woman Suffrage (CUWS), mobilized her supporters to launch the National Woman's Party (NWP). The NWP used civil disobedi... In 1916 Alice Paul, founder of the militant suffragist organization, the Congressional Union of Woman Suffrage (CUWS), mobilized her supporters to launch the National Woman's Party (NWP). The NWP used civil disobedience tactics to promote the passage of the woman suffrage amendment. Paul’s strategies contributed to the passage of the federal Suffrage Amendment in 1919 and its ratification in 1920. After 1920 the NWP turned its attention to the passage of an Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). Show more Show less 1916 7 20
National Women's Conference : 1977 Nov. 18-21: Houston, TX Held in Houston in 1977, the National Women’s Conference was funded by Congress and supported by leaders within the Democratic and Republican parties. The wives of four presidents attended along with more than 20,... Held in Houston in 1977, the National Women’s Conference was funded by Congress and supported by leaders within the Democratic and Republican parties. The wives of four presidents attended along with more than 20,000 women, children, and men. Bella Abzug presided. The Houston conference marked a high point in the history of feminism during the second half of the twentieth century. State conventions preceded the national meeting, where delegates considered a "national plan" of legislation designed to improve women’s lives. Show more Show less 1977
New England Woman Suffrage Association Founded in 1868, the Association concentrated its focus exclusively on woman suffrage and contributed to the emergence of the American Woman Suffrage Association (see above) to channel women reformers' support for t... Founded in 1868, the Association concentrated its focus exclusively on woman suffrage and contributed to the emergence of the American Woman Suffrage Association (see above) to channel women reformers' support for the Fifteenth Amendment. Early leaders included Lucy Stone and Isabella Beecher Hooker. Show more Show less 1868
Religious Society of Friends 1652 1
Tuskegee Institute Founded in 1881, Tuskegee Institute is today Tuskegee University. Booker T. Washington, the Institute’s first president from 1881 until his death in 1915, exercised unprecedented power among African Americans part... Founded in 1881, Tuskegee Institute is today Tuskegee University. Booker T. Washington, the Institute’s first president from 1881 until his death in 1915, exercised unprecedented power among African Americans partly because his plan for black economic improvement without political rights was well funded by wealthy white donors. Called the "Atlanta Compromise," the plan emerged in 1895, stressing the need for practical, industrial training, such as that supplied by Tuskegee Institute, and minimizing the need for black political rights. Show more Show less 1881 2
Woman's Christian Temperance Union Founded in 1873, the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union quickly became the largest voluntary association in the United States. Working closely with the much-smaller woman suffrage movement, the WCTU endorsed woman... Founded in 1873, the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union quickly became the largest voluntary association in the United States. Working closely with the much-smaller woman suffrage movement, the WCTU endorsed woman suffrage in 1881, by which time it had become the most important vehicle for women’s participation in public life. Key to the WCTU’s prominence was Frances Willard’s leadership and her "Do Everything" policy, which enabled the Union to support a wide range of reform activities other than temperance, including prison reform, child welfare, women's employment, work among African Americans, public health, and woman suffrage. Show more Show less 1873 3 42
Woman's Peace Party Founded in January 1915, after the outbreak of World War I, the Woman's Peace Party worked to control armaments and called for a mediated settlement to the war. Members traveled to The Hague in 1915 to meet with wom... Founded in January 1915, after the outbreak of World War I, the Woman's Peace Party worked to control armaments and called for a mediated settlement to the war. Members traveled to The Hague in 1915 to meet with women peace supporters from European nations (see the document project, "How Did Women Activists Promote Peace in Their 1915 Tour of Warring European Capitals?" also on this website). At the conclusion of the war, Woman's Peace Party members traveled to an international conference in Zurich to protest the punitive stance of the Versailles Treaty toward defeated Germany. The conference led to the formation of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (see below) and the Woman's Peace Party became the American Section of WILPF. Show more Show less 1915 9 10

Pages