Browse Organizations

Displaying 1 - 13 of 13
Namesort descending Description Founding year Works by Works about Works to
Woman's Christian Temperance Union Founded in 1873, the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union quickly became the largest voluntary association in the United States. Working closely with the much-smaller woman suffrage movement, the WCTU endorsed woman... Founded in 1873, the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union quickly became the largest voluntary association in the United States. Working closely with the much-smaller woman suffrage movement, the WCTU endorsed woman suffrage in 1881, by which time it had become the most important vehicle for women’s participation in public life. Key to the WCTU’s prominence was Frances Willard’s leadership and her "Do Everything" policy, which enabled the Union to support a wide range of reform activities other than temperance, including prison reform, child welfare, women's employment, work among African Americans, public health, and woman suffrage. Show more Show less 1873 3 42
Woman's Peace Party Founded in January 1915, after the outbreak of World War I, the Woman's Peace Party worked to control armaments and called for a mediated settlement to the war. Members traveled to The Hague in 1915 to meet with wom... Founded in January 1915, after the outbreak of World War I, the Woman's Peace Party worked to control armaments and called for a mediated settlement to the war. Members traveled to The Hague in 1915 to meet with women peace supporters from European nations (see the document project, "How Did Women Activists Promote Peace in Their 1915 Tour of Warring European Capitals?" also on this website). At the conclusion of the war, Woman's Peace Party members traveled to an international conference in Zurich to protest the punitive stance of the Versailles Treaty toward defeated Germany. The conference led to the formation of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (see below) and the Woman's Peace Party became the American Section of WILPF. Show more Show less 1915 9 10
Women in Law and Development in Africa Women in Law and Development in Africa (WiLDAF) was founded in 1990 as a pan-African network to support legal strategies to increase the role of women in politics and in development in African nations. Its headquart... Women in Law and Development in Africa (WiLDAF) was founded in 1990 as a pan-African network to support legal strategies to increase the role of women in politics and in development in African nations. Its headquarters are in Harare, Zimbabwe, and it coordinates the work of groups in over 30 countries. Women and Social Movements International includes several documents related to WiLDAF. Show more Show less 1990 18
Women on Waves http://www.womenonwaves.orgEstablished in 1999 by Dr. Rebecca Gomperts, Women on Waves (WoW) is a Dutch non-profit organization that provides pro-choice options for women in countries with restrictive abortion laws.... http://www.womenonwaves.orgEstablished in 1999 by Dr. Rebecca Gomperts, Women on Waves (WoW) is a Dutch non-profit organization that provides pro-choice options for women in countries with restrictive abortion laws. On board a ship, the WoW visits countries and allows women to make appointments before sailing into international waters to provide the medical services legally. Documents in Women and Social Movements International relate to several voyages taken by WoW in the 2000s. Show more Show less 1999 2 2
Women's International Democratic Federation The Women’s International Democratic Federation (WIDF) was founded in late 1945, at a Congress in Paris attended by more than 800 participants representing organizations from 40 countries. Anti-fascist in origin,... The Women’s International Democratic Federation (WIDF) was founded in late 1945, at a Congress in Paris attended by more than 800 participants representing organizations from 40 countries. Anti-fascist in origin, it sought to unite feminism and left politics and included many women who had been active in resistance movements during World War II. It received early consultative status with the United Nations, but Cold-War politics led to its exclusion from U.N. participation between 1954 and 1967. The WIDF was the originator of the call for International Women’s Year in 1975 and since its founding has promoted equal rights for women, self-determination and national independence, and the rights of children. It opposes all forms of violence including atomic weapons and has opposed U.S. imperial endeavors as well as colonialism more broadly. During the Cold War, the leading role of the Soviet Union in supporting the WIDF was used to discredit the feminism of the Federation, and the International Alliance of Women and the International Council of Women competed with the WIDF to attract support from the Global South. The materials in this digital archive include extensive conference proceedings and reports. Show more Show less 1945 31 21
Women's International League for Peace and Freedom The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) grew out of the International Congress of Women at The Hague, which brought together over 1,000 women in 1915 to work for a peaceful end to the war in... The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) grew out of the International Congress of Women at The Hague, which brought together over 1,000 women in 1915 to work for a peaceful end to the war in Europe. Women who attended this first conference and whose writings are included in this digital archive include Jane Addams, Emily Greene Balch, Aletta Jacobs, and Chrystal Macmillan. Over the years, WILPF protested chemical and biological warfare, worked towards World Disarmament, and worked with both the League of Nations and the United Nations. Today, WILPF continues to work with the UN as an NGO as well as with national and local governments and promotes peace through non-violent means. WILPF-related materials in this digital archive include congress proceedings, correspondence between WILPF leaders, and reports about national peace and women’s movements. Show more Show less 1915 46 134
Women's International Zionist Organization Founded in London in 1920, the Women’s International Zionist Organization (WIZO) was formed as part of the Zionist movement to establish a Jewish nation in Palestine. Women created this group separately as a way t... Founded in London in 1920, the Women’s International Zionist Organization (WIZO) was formed as part of the Zionist movement to establish a Jewish nation in Palestine. Women created this group separately as a way to focus their efforts on education and health and social services for women and children in Palestine. Today, the organization promotes women’s and children’s welfare in Israel. The most recent WIZO conference was held in 2008 and had the theme "Investing in People for Israel's Future." WIZO materials available in this database include: minutes from conferences, descriptions of women leaders of WIZO, and reports on WIZO activities. Show more Show less 1920 16 18
Women's National Indian Association 1879 1
Women's Peace Congress/International Congress of Women :Hague, Netherlands Initiated by the Woman’s Peace Party (U.S.), the International Congress of Women at The Hague was chaired by Jane Addams. Over 1,000 women attended the Congress to protest World War I and work toward a mediated en... Initiated by the Woman’s Peace Party (U.S.), the International Congress of Women at The Hague was chaired by Jane Addams. Over 1,000 women attended the Congress to protest World War I and work toward a mediated end to the conflict. The Congress created the International Committee of Women for Permanent Peace (ICWPP), which sponsored the 1919 Second International Congress of Women in Zurich and founded the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). WASMI includes the proceedings of the 1915 Hague and 1919 Zurich Congresses as well as related documents of those attending the meetings, including Jane Addams, Emily Greene Balch, Aletta Jacobs, and Chrystal Macmillan. Show more Show less 1915 8
World Woman's Christian Temperance Union The World’s Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WWCTU) was founded by Frances Willard in 1883 at the 10th annual WCTU Convention in Detroit, Michigan. The WWCTU’s first convention was held in 1891 in Boston, a... The World’s Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WWCTU) was founded by Frances Willard in 1883 at the 10th annual WCTU Convention in Detroit, Michigan. The WWCTU’s first convention was held in 1891 in Boston, and it united national groups that sought to remove alcohol and drugs (opium) from the world. Based in evangelical Christianity, the Union sent mission workers with an Anglo-American perspective to “foreign” places. As part of its interest in women’s issues, the WWCTU was a founding member of the International Council of Women, and it received status as a UN NGO in 1945. The organization’s 38th convention met in 2010. Materials include conference proceedings, institutional publications, and individual writings speaking to women’s experiences with the WWCTU. Show more Show less 1883 38 48
World Woman's Party Alice Paul and the U.S. National Woman's Party established the World Woman's Party in 1938 to advance equal rights legislation for women at the international level, especially the Equal Rights Treaty. The WWP coordi... Alice Paul and the U.S. National Woman's Party established the World Woman's Party in 1938 to advance equal rights legislation for women at the international level, especially the Equal Rights Treaty. The WWP coordinated work with Equal Rights International (ERI) and other organizations with similar objectives. Women and Social Movements International includes manuscript materials from the National Woman's Party Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Show more Show less 1938 10 16 1
World's Anti-Slavery Convention : London, England The British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society brought abolitionist societies together for the World’s Anti-Slavery Convention held in London in June 1840. The convention sought to create an international movement a... The British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society brought abolitionist societies together for the World’s Anti-Slavery Convention held in London in June 1840. The convention sought to create an international movement against slavery, uniting abolitionist organizations in Britain, Europe and the United States. Convention delegates immediately confronted the issue of whether to seat American women chosen by their organizations as delegates. Lucretia Mott and Sarah Pugh were two of the six American women delegates who were denied seats at the convention. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, recently married to abolitionist Henry Stanton, attended the meeting as a non-delegate. Affronted by the refusal of the convention to accept women delegates, Mott and Stanton became friends and went on to organize the 1848 Seneca Falls (N.Y.) Convention that launched a series of women’s rights conventions, many of which were attended by British and European women. Materials in this digital archive related to the 1840 convention include Mott’s diary, Mott’s letters and extensive correspondence between Sarah Pugh and British abolitionists. Also included are selections from the convention proceedings, and the proceedings of the 1940 Woman's Centennial Congress that marked the 100-year anniversary of the London event. Show more Show less 1 92
World's Young Women's Christian Association The World Young Women’s Christian Association, or the World YWCA (WYWCA), began as a Christian organization focused on missionary goals. The Association held its first conference in London in 1898, bringing togeth... The World Young Women’s Christian Association, or the World YWCA (WYWCA), began as a Christian organization focused on missionary goals. The Association held its first conference in London in 1898, bringing together 326 participants from 17 countries. Jane Kinnaird and Emma Roberts, both of London, are considered its founders. In 1920 at Champèry, the organization redefined its purpose following the experiences of humanitarian relief during the First World War. As part of this transition, the World YWCA shifted its focus to peace efforts, like other international women’s organizations during this era. In addition to peace with justice, this organization takes on issues such as sexual and reproductive health, violence against women, women’s human rights, economic empowerment, and environmental sustainability. Materials in the archive include conference proceedings, institutional publications, and manuscript material from women active in the organization. Show more Show less 1890 47 203