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Namesort ascending Description Founding year Works by Works about Works to
Young Women's Christian Association of the United States of America. National Committee 10
Young Women's Christian Association of the United States of America. National Board. Foreign Department 6 3
Young Women's Christian Association of the United States of America. National Board 7 3
Young Women's Christian Association of the United States of America. International Division 1
Young Women's Christian Association of the United States of America During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), named after a similar men’s organization, was organized largely by middle-class white women in cities around the nati... During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), named after a similar men’s organization, was organized largely by middle-class white women in cities around the nation who built Association boarding houses, training schools, and day nurseries to protect and provide services for single women in cities. In more recent decades the YWCA has continued a wide range of activities including shelter for women and children and support for women’s reproductive rights. Show more Show less 1858 18 257 57
Young Women's Christian Association of Liberia 1
YWCA School for Social Work 2
World's Young Women's Christian Association The World Young Women’s Christian Association, or the World YWCA (WYWCA), began as a Christian organization focused on missionary goals. The Association held its first conference in London in 1898, bringing togeth... The World Young Women’s Christian Association, or the World YWCA (WYWCA), began as a Christian organization focused on missionary goals. The Association held its first conference in London in 1898, bringing together 326 participants from 17 countries. Jane Kinnaird and Emma Roberts, both of London, are considered its founders. In 1920 at Champèry, the organization redefined its purpose following the experiences of humanitarian relief during the First World War. As part of this transition, the World YWCA shifted its focus to peace efforts, like other international women’s organizations during this era. In addition to peace with justice, this organization takes on issues such as sexual and reproductive health, violence against women, women’s human rights, economic empowerment, and environmental sustainability. Materials in the archive include conference proceedings, institutional publications, and manuscript material from women active in the organization. Show more Show less 1890 47 203
World's Congress of Representative Women : 1893 : Chicago, IL 1893 1 1
World's Anti-Slavery Convention : London, England The British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society brought abolitionist societies together for the World’s Anti-Slavery Convention held in London in June 1840. The convention sought to create an international movement a... The British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society brought abolitionist societies together for the World’s Anti-Slavery Convention held in London in June 1840. The convention sought to create an international movement against slavery, uniting abolitionist organizations in Britain, Europe and the United States. Convention delegates immediately confronted the issue of whether to seat American women chosen by their organizations as delegates. Lucretia Mott and Sarah Pugh were two of the six American women delegates who were denied seats at the convention. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, recently married to abolitionist Henry Stanton, attended the meeting as a non-delegate. Affronted by the refusal of the convention to accept women delegates, Mott and Stanton became friends and went on to organize the 1848 Seneca Falls (N.Y.) Convention that launched a series of women’s rights conventions, many of which were attended by British and European women. Materials in this digital archive related to the 1840 convention include Mott’s diary, Mott’s letters and extensive correspondence between Sarah Pugh and British abolitionists. Also included are selections from the convention proceedings, and the proceedings of the 1940 Woman's Centennial Congress that marked the 100-year anniversary of the London event. Show more Show less 1 92
World Woman's Party Alice Paul and the U.S. National Woman's Party established the World Woman's Party in 1938 to advance equal rights legislation for women at the international level, especially the Equal Rights Treaty. The WWP coordi... Alice Paul and the U.S. National Woman's Party established the World Woman's Party in 1938 to advance equal rights legislation for women at the international level, especially the Equal Rights Treaty. The WWP coordinated work with Equal Rights International (ERI) and other organizations with similar objectives. Women and Social Movements International includes manuscript materials from the National Woman's Party Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Show more Show less 1938 10 16 1
World Woman's Christian Temperance Union The World’s Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WWCTU) was founded by Frances Willard in 1883 at the 10th annual WCTU Convention in Detroit, Michigan. The WWCTU’s first convention was held in 1891 in Boston, a... The World’s Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WWCTU) was founded by Frances Willard in 1883 at the 10th annual WCTU Convention in Detroit, Michigan. The WWCTU’s first convention was held in 1891 in Boston, and it united national groups that sought to remove alcohol and drugs (opium) from the world. Based in evangelical Christianity, the Union sent mission workers with an Anglo-American perspective to “foreign” places. As part of its interest in women’s issues, the WWCTU was a founding member of the International Council of Women, and it received status as a UN NGO in 1945. The organization’s 38th convention met in 2010. Materials include conference proceedings, institutional publications, and individual writings speaking to women’s experiences with the WWCTU. Show more Show less 1883 38 48
World Union of Women 5 1
World Health Organization 1948 3
World Food Programme 1
World Federation of Trade Unions 1 1
World Federation of Democratic Youth 1945 1
World Council of Churches and Women in Church and Society 1 1
World Congress of Women 1 3
World Congress of Jewish Women 2 1
World Conference on Women : 1985 : Nairobi, Kenya 1985 31
Women's Rights Project 1
Women's Relief Society 1
Women's Pro-League Council
Women's Political Association 1

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