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Namesort descending Description Founding year Works by Works about Works to
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People In 1909 W.E.B. Du Bois, other participants in the Niagara Movement, women activists including Mary Church Terrell and Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and other African-American critics of Booker T. Washington united with whit... In 1909 W.E.B. Du Bois, other participants in the Niagara Movement, women activists including Mary Church Terrell and Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and other African-American critics of Booker T. Washington united with white supporters to form the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Still an important representative of African American interests, the NAACP has a long history of defending and expanding black civil rights. Show more Show less 1909 1
National Council of Negro Women 4 5 3
National Council of Women of the United States The National Council of Women (NCW) was founded in 1888 as the national section of the International Council of Women. The NCW aimed to "promote the welfare of all women of the country" and became an umbrella organi... The National Council of Women (NCW) was founded in 1888 as the national section of the International Council of Women. The NCW aimed to "promote the welfare of all women of the country" and became an umbrella organization for numerous women’s organizations including the American Association of University Women and the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. Show more Show less 1888 7
National League of Women Voters The League of Women Voters (LWV) is a United States nonpartisan organization that formed out of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) in 1920. In addition to a domestic focus on voter education, t... The League of Women Voters (LWV) is a United States nonpartisan organization that formed out of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) in 1920. In addition to a domestic focus on voter education, the LWV developed international committees to address foreign affairs. In its early years, the LWV established the Department of International Cooperation to Prevent War, which focused on peace work. In 1947 it set up the Carrie Chapman Catt Memorial Fund to provide civic education to women whose countries were transitioning to democratic governments. The name of the Memorial Fund changed to the Overseas Education Fund (OEF) in 1961 and OEF International in 1986. This digital archive includes selected international material from the Department of International Cooperation in the 1920s and 1930s and OEF International material from the 1940s to the 1990s. Show more Show less 1919 12 19
National Woman Suffrage Association Founded by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony after the demise of the American Equal Rights Association, this woman suffrage organization supported a wide range of women's rights issues. Led by an all-women... Founded by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony after the demise of the American Equal Rights Association, this woman suffrage organization supported a wide range of women's rights issues. Led by an all-women slate of officers, the Association promoted a conscious strategy of organizing women independently of male-dominated political parties. Competition between the National and the American Woman Suffrage Association (see above) divided the woman suffrage movement until the two organizations merged in 1890. Show more Show less 1869 1
National Woman's Party, US In 1916 Alice Paul, founder of the militant suffragist organization, the Congressional Union of Woman Suffrage (CUWS), mobilized her supporters to launch the National Woman's Party (NWP). The NWP used civil disobedi... In 1916 Alice Paul, founder of the militant suffragist organization, the Congressional Union of Woman Suffrage (CUWS), mobilized her supporters to launch the National Woman's Party (NWP). The NWP used civil disobedience tactics to promote the passage of the woman suffrage amendment. Paul’s strategies contributed to the passage of the federal Suffrage Amendment in 1919 and its ratification in 1920. After 1920 the NWP turned its attention to the passage of an Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). Show more Show less 1916 7 20
National Women's Conference : 1977 Nov. 18-21: Houston, TX Held in Houston in 1977, the National Women’s Conference was funded by Congress and supported by leaders within the Democratic and Republican parties. The wives of four presidents attended along with more than 20,... Held in Houston in 1977, the National Women’s Conference was funded by Congress and supported by leaders within the Democratic and Republican parties. The wives of four presidents attended along with more than 20,000 women, children, and men. Bella Abzug presided. The Houston conference marked a high point in the history of feminism during the second half of the twentieth century. State conventions preceded the national meeting, where delegates considered a "national plan" of legislation designed to improve women’s lives. Show more Show less 1977
Network of East-West Women In June 1991, a group of seventy-five women from Eastern European countries met in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, forming the Network of East-West Women (NEWW). The NEWW fosters communication among women from more than thir... In June 1991, a group of seventy-five women from Eastern European countries met in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, forming the Network of East-West Women (NEWW). The NEWW fosters communication among women from more than thirty countries and supports projects and workshops as well as email networks to promote democracy and women's movements in Central and Eastern Europe. Women and Social Movements International includes several NEWW publications. Show more Show less 1991 1 4
New England Woman Suffrage Association Founded in 1868, the Association concentrated its focus exclusively on woman suffrage and contributed to the emergence of the American Woman Suffrage Association (see above) to channel women reformers' support for t... Founded in 1868, the Association concentrated its focus exclusively on woman suffrage and contributed to the emergence of the American Woman Suffrage Association (see above) to channel women reformers' support for the Fifteenth Amendment. Early leaders included Lucy Stone and Isabella Beecher Hooker. Show more Show less 1868
Open Door International for the Economic Emancipation of the Woman Worker Open Door International for the Economic Emancipation of the Woman Worker (ODI) was founded in 1929 to address issues of gender equality in the workplace. Chrystal Macmillan served as first president of the organiza... Open Door International for the Economic Emancipation of the Woman Worker (ODI) was founded in 1929 to address issues of gender equality in the workplace. Chrystal Macmillan served as first president of the organization, which had membership from 21 nations. However, membership quickly dwindled after World War II, and the organization died in 1974. Statements on women’s work and conference proceedings make up the bulk of ODI material found in this digital archive. Show more Show less 1929 21 18
Pan American Scientific Congress. Women's Auxiliary Committee The Women’s Auxiliary Committee met alongside the Second Pan American Scientific Congress in Washington, D.C., December 1915 to January 1916. The Committee was created and supported by the congress to coordinate t... The Women’s Auxiliary Committee met alongside the Second Pan American Scientific Congress in Washington, D.C., December 1915 to January 1916. The Committee was created and supported by the congress to coordinate the interests of women and children in the Western hemisphere. The Second Pan American Conference of Women met during the Third Pan American Scientific Congress in Lima, December 1924-January 1925. Show more Show less 1915 2 2
Pan Pacific and Southeast Asia Women's Association The Pan Pacific Women’s Association (later, the Pan Pacific and South East Asia Women’s Association(PPSEAWA)) held its first conference in Honolulu, Hawaii, in 1928. The aims of the organization are to promote p... The Pan Pacific Women’s Association (later, the Pan Pacific and South East Asia Women’s Association(PPSEAWA)) held its first conference in Honolulu, Hawaii, in 1928. The aims of the organization are to promote peace and cooperation among the peoples in the Pacific region, and it focuses particularly on issues concerning the status of women and children. The PPSEAWA works to solve problems concerning women and children, addresses concerns with family and child welfare, and supports education and skills training in addition to fundraising for areas of interest to the organization. Today, the PPSEAWA includes 19 national organizations, many with local chapters. The PPSEAWA held its 24th International Conference in May 2010. This digital archive includes proceedings from the organization’s conferences as well as manuscript material from the Sophia Smith Collection and the Schlesinger Library. Show more Show less 1928 35 76
Peace and Disarmament Committee of the Women's International Organisations The Peace and Disarmament Committee of the Women's International Organizations (PDCWIO) originated in 1931 as the disarmament committee for the Liaison Committee of Women's International Organizations (LCWIO). The C... The Peace and Disarmament Committee of the Women's International Organizations (PDCWIO) originated in 1931 as the disarmament committee for the Liaison Committee of Women's International Organizations (LCWIO). The Committee acted as a clearinghouse of information in Geneva for many women's organizations during the League of Nations Disarmament Conference in 1932-1934. In 1935, the PDCWIO took its new name and separated from the Liaison Committee. Mary Dingman served as president from 1931-1939, and the organization dissolved during World War II. Women and Social Movements International includes reports of the work of the Committee in English and French over the course of its active work. Show more Show less 1931 125 119 5
Presbyterian Church of the USA. Board of Foreign Missions The Board of Missions coordinated the missionary work of various presbyteries beginning in 1816, taking over the work of an earlier Standing Committee on Mission of the Presbyterian Church. It sought to spread the G... The Board of Missions coordinated the missionary work of various presbyteries beginning in 1816, taking over the work of an earlier Standing Committee on Mission of the Presbyterian Church. It sought to spread the Gospel both within the United States and internationally. Missions were founded in Latin America, the Middle East and the Far East, as well as within the United States. Presbyterian mission work included the organizing of schools, hospitals, and orphanages as well as churches. Show more Show less 2
Reformed Church in America. Women's Board of Foreign Missions Evangelical Protestant missions created an avenue for transnational work for women, especially for American women during the nineteenth century. Women and Social Movements International traces women's mission-relate... Evangelical Protestant missions created an avenue for transnational work for women, especially for American women during the nineteenth century. Women and Social Movements International traces women's mission-related experiences by including women's memoirs as well as mission society reports and publications. Other women's organizations that conducted related missionary work include the World's Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WWCTU) and the World Young Women's Christian Association (WYWCA). Show more Show less 2
Religious Society of Friends 1652 1
Sisters in Islam Based in Malaysia, the Sisters in Islam (SIS) develop programs and activities to advocate for the principles of a progressive Islam, with special awareness of women's rights and equality for all citizens. 1987 2 4
Socialist International Women The first International Socialist Women’s Conference took place in 1907 in Stuttgart, Germany. At that meeting, Clara Zetkin led the Women’s International Secretariat, which was part of the international sociali... The first International Socialist Women’s Conference took place in 1907 in Stuttgart, Germany. At that meeting, Clara Zetkin led the Women’s International Secretariat, which was part of the international socialist movement. In 1955, representing the non-communist socialist movement, the organization became the International Council of Social Democratic Women (ICSDW), and in 1978, Socialist International Women (SIW). Today, Socialist International Women works to end gender discrimination, promote peace, and increase women’s political participation. SIW is a non-governmental organization with consultative status at the UN. In 2008, SIW hosted its XIX Congress in Athens, Greece, with the theme “Women’s Rights are Human Rights.” Materials from SIW in this database include conference proceedings as well as statements made by the organization and its predecessors since 1907. Show more Show less 1907 13 15
St. Joan's International Alliance In 1911, a group of Catholic women, who supported women's suffrage, united as the Catholic Women's Suffrage Society in London. The CWSS changed its name to the St. Joan's Social and Political Alliance in 1923, suppo... In 1911, a group of Catholic women, who supported women's suffrage, united as the Catholic Women's Suffrage Society in London. The CWSS changed its name to the St. Joan's Social and Political Alliance in 1923, supporting membership from other countries. In addition to suffrage, the Alliance supported anti-trafficking efforts and independent nationality for married women as well as equal pay for women and revisions to Catholic doctrine regarding women and the Church. Women and Social Movements International includes several documents about this organization. Show more Show less 1911 4 2
Tuskegee Institute Founded in 1881, Tuskegee Institute is today Tuskegee University. Booker T. Washington, the Institute’s first president from 1881 until his death in 1915, exercised unprecedented power among African Americans part... Founded in 1881, Tuskegee Institute is today Tuskegee University. Booker T. Washington, the Institute’s first president from 1881 until his death in 1915, exercised unprecedented power among African Americans partly because his plan for black economic improvement without political rights was well funded by wealthy white donors. Called the "Atlanta Compromise," the plan emerged in 1895, stressing the need for practical, industrial training, such as that supplied by Tuskegee Institute, and minimizing the need for black political rights. Show more Show less 1881 2
United Nations The United Nations (UN) was established following World War II to replace the League of Nations as the global intergovernmental body in an effort to ensure peace, to prevent another world war, and to create a forum... The United Nations (UN) was established following World War II to replace the League of Nations as the global intergovernmental body in an effort to ensure peace, to prevent another world war, and to create a forum for international diplomacy. The UN Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW) was created by the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in 1946 to provide recommendations and reports to the Council regarding the interests of women. It was designed to promote equality among women and men as well as address women's rights in political, social, civil, economic, and educational fields. The UN sponsored a "Decade for Women," 1975-1985 that included three major international women’s conferences and addressed policy issues related to women’s equality worldwide. A fourth major UN international women’s conference was held in Beijing in 1995. Show more Show less 1945 1
United Nations Development Fund for Women UNIFEM was established in 1976, and it supports financially and with technical assistanceactivities that promote gender equality and that work to end discrimination and violence againstwomen. 1976 3 3
United Nations World Conference on Human Rights, 2nd, Vienna, 14-25 June 1993 During June 1993, the United Nations held the World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna, Austria. The Conference reaffirmed the commitment to the 1948 Declaration of Human Rights and passed both the Vienna Declarat... During June 1993, the United Nations held the World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna, Austria. The Conference reaffirmed the commitment to the 1948 Declaration of Human Rights and passed both the Vienna Declaration and the Programme of Action as means of strengthening efforts to protect human rights globally. Show more Show less 10
United Nations World Conference to Review and Appraise the Achievements of the United Nations Decade for Women, 3rd : Nairobi : 1985 The United Nations held the third World Conference on Women in 1985 at Nairobi. The UN published the report from the conference: Forward-Looking Strategies for the Advancement of Women to the Year 2000. 1985 68
United Nations World Conference to Review and Appraise the Achievements of the United Nations Decade for Women, 4th : 1995 : Beijing, China The United Nations held the Fourth World Conference on Women: Action for Equality, Development and Peace in Beijing, China, in 1995. The main themes of the conference included women and poverty, education and traini... The United Nations held the Fourth World Conference on Women: Action for Equality, Development and Peace in Beijing, China, in 1995. The main themes of the conference included women and poverty, education and training of women, women and health, violence against women, women and armed conflict, women and the economy, women and decision-making, institutional gender mainstreaming, women and the media, women and the environment, and the girl-child. Most importantly, perhaps, the Beijing conference urged that the human rights of women and the girls be considered integral to universal human rights. This digital archive includes the Beijing Declaration and the Beijing Platform for Action, as well as selected country reports and reports of NGOs regarding progress on the status and advancement of women. Also included are the five-year reviews of the Declaration and Platform: Beijing +5, Beijing +10, and Beijing +15. Show more Show less 1995 118

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