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Namesort descending Description Founding year Works by Works about Works to
American Woman Suffrage Association This wing of the woman suffrage movement was formed by New England women opposed to the policies of Stanton and Anthony. Led by Lucy Stone and Julia Ward Howe, the Association worked for the passage of the Fifteenth... This wing of the woman suffrage movement was formed by New England women opposed to the policies of Stanton and Anthony. Led by Lucy Stone and Julia Ward Howe, the Association worked for the passage of the Fifteenth Amendment and aligned itself closely with the Republican party. The American and the National Woman Suffrage Association (see below) merged in 1890 to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (see entry below). Show more Show less 1869 1 11
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 4th : 1872 : St. Louis. MO 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 10th : 1879 : Cincinnati, OH 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 11th : 1880 : Washington, DC 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 12th : 1881: Louisville, KY 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 16th : 1884 Nov. 19-20 : Chicago, IL 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 17th : 1885 Oct. 13-15 : Minneapolis, MN 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 18th : 1886 Oct. 26-28 : Topeka, KS 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 19th : 1887 Oct. 31-Nov. 2 : Philadelphia, PA 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 20th : 1888 Nov. 20-22 : Cincinnati, OH 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 6th : 1874 : Detroit, MI 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 7th : 1875 : New York, NY 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 8th : 1876 Oct. 2 : Philadelphia, PA 1
American Woman Suffrage Association. Annual Meeting, 9th : 1878 Nov. : Indianapolis, IN 2
Anchorage School District Career Center, Anchorage, AK 1
Anchorage, AK. Assembly 1
Anchorage, AK. Women's Commission 5
Andersonville Prison Camp 2
Angel Island Immigration Center
Ann Arbor Women's Liberation Coalition. Sunday Night Group 1
Anne Hathaway Club, Colorado Springs, CO 1
Annie E. Casey Foundation 3
Anti-Feminist Movement After Congress passed the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, which gave women the right to vote, female anti-suffragists did not fade into political obscurity. Instead, a coalition of anti-suffragists organized a broad p... After Congress passed the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, which gave women the right to vote, female anti-suffragists did not fade into political obscurity. Instead, a coalition of anti-suffragists organized a broad political movement to oppose expansion of social welfare programs and women's peace efforts, and to foster a political culture hostile to progressive female activists. Antifeminists sought to limit the social reform movements energized by progressive and feminist women in the 1920s. Show more Show less 1920 3
Anti-Lynching Crusaders The Anti-Lynching Crusaders, founded in 1922 under the aegis of the NAACP was largely a black women's organization that aimed to raise money to promote the passage of the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill and to prevent lynch... The Anti-Lynching Crusaders, founded in 1922 under the aegis of the NAACP was largely a black women's organization that aimed to raise money to promote the passage of the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill and to prevent lynching generally. The Dyer Bill was the first anti-lynching bill to be voted upon by the Senate, despite many earlier attempts by anti-lynching groups. Lynching did not become a federal offense until the passage of the U.S. Civil Rights Act of 1965. Show more Show less 1922 1 1
Anti-Lynching Movement Between 1880 and 1930 more than 3,200 African Americans were lynched in the South. Opposition to lynching grew after 1890 with black women like Ida B. Wells and Mary Church Terrell among the first Southerners to spe... Between 1880 and 1930 more than 3,200 African Americans were lynched in the South. Opposition to lynching grew after 1890 with black women like Ida B. Wells and Mary Church Terrell among the first Southerners to speak out. Women’s groups, including the largely Black Anti-Lynching Crusaders and the white Association of Southern Women to Prevent Lynching, played significant roles in the movement against lynching. Show more Show less 1890 8

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