Browse Social Movements

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Name Description Founding year Related works
Daughters of Bilitis The Daughters of Bilitis (DOB) was a lesbian social and political organization formed in San Francisco in 1955 by Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon. Though the DOB often worked with the Mattachine Society and others in th... The Daughters of Bilitis (DOB) was a lesbian social and political organization formed in San Francisco in 1955 by Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon. Though the DOB often worked with the Mattachine Society and others in the male-dominated homophile movement, members of the DOB insisted on recognizing their dual experiences as both women and lesbians. In October 1956 the DOB began publishing The Ladder, which over its sixteen years of publication would address contemporary attitudes about lesbians, the growing gay rights movement, and the emergence of the women’s liberation movement. Show more Show less 1955 1
Daughters of the American Revolution Founded in 1891, and still in existence today, the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) was the female counterpart to numerous male patriotic societies that sprang up in the 1890s. Initially, the Daughters ref... Founded in 1891, and still in existence today, the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) was the female counterpart to numerous male patriotic societies that sprang up in the 1890s. Initially, the Daughters refrained from purely political activities, instead devoting themselves to promoting patriotic celebrations and erecting monuments and markers to honor Revolutionary forefathers. During World War I, DAR members supported war work. After the end of World War I, the DAR opposed women’s pacifist groups including the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. Show more Show less 1891 6
Dress Reform The dress reform movement of the 1840s and 50s responded to the fact that, while men's clothing had become more restrained and utilitarian in the decades before 1840, women's clothing became more ornamental and dysf... The dress reform movement of the 1840s and 50s responded to the fact that, while men's clothing had become more restrained and utilitarian in the decades before 1840, women's clothing became more ornamental and dysfunctional. Reformers promoted the wearing of trousers (popularly known as “Bloomers”) among women. Three different strands of reformers can be distinguished within this social movement: the water curists, the Oneida Community, and woman's rights reformers. Notable figures in this movement include John Humphrey Noyes of the Oneida community, and the women’s rights activists Elizabeth Smith Miller, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Amelia Bloomer. Show more Show less 1840 5