Browse Social Movements

Displaying 1 - 4 of 4
Starts with Fe|Fo|Fr|Back to all A-Z
Name Description Founding year Related works
Female Moral Reform Movement Moral reform was a campaign in the 1830s and '40s to abolish sexual licentiousness, prostitution, and the sexual double standard, and to promote sexual abstinence among the young as they entered the marriage market.... Moral reform was a campaign in the 1830s and '40s to abolish sexual licentiousness, prostitution, and the sexual double standard, and to promote sexual abstinence among the young as they entered the marriage market. By 1841, approximately 50,000 women had joined more than 600 local Female Moral Reform Societies (FMRS). Moral reform was the nation’s first explicitly female social movement, comprised of women and led by women. Show more Show less 1835 4
Feminism, 1960s- Feminism, dedicated to greater equality between men and women, reemerged as a central feature of public life in the 1960s, partly inspired by the burgeoning social movements of that decade: the New Left, the civil... Feminism, dedicated to greater equality between men and women, reemerged as a central feature of public life in the 1960s, partly inspired by the burgeoning social movements of that decade: the New Left, the civil rights movement, opposition to the war in Vietnam, and gay rights. Feminist organizations were numerous and diverse, often competing with one another, and promoted a multitude of social and political issues, including the enforcement of Title VII in the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which prohibited sex discrimination in employment; access to birth control and abortion; the elimination of pornography and domestic violence, the rights of women of color and lesbian rights. Though challenged by the rise of conservatism in the 1970s, feminist values and ideas changed American life in the last third of the twentieth century and the movement continues as a vital force in the twenty-first century. Show more Show less 1960 10
Foreign Missionary Movement Women's missionary enterprise was one of the earliest and largest social reform movements in the United States. The movement attracted evangelical women spurred by religious faith to promote Christianity at home and... Women's missionary enterprise was one of the earliest and largest social reform movements in the United States. The movement attracted evangelical women spurred by religious faith to promote Christianity at home and abroad. American laywomen were active participants in Protestant and Catholic missionary efforts in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Women's participation began in domestic fundraising for male-dominated foreign missions, but by the second half of the nineteenth century, laywomen began to organize separate women's boards and to set their own agendas for mission activity. By 1911 some two million women were members in groups that were part of the women's missionary movement. Typically sent abroad as teachers or ministers' wives, women carved out for themselves increasingly important roles in foreign missions. According to the scholar Jane Hunter, at the peak of mission activity women comprised two-thirds of all missionaries working abroad. Show more Show less 1830 2
Freedmen's Aid Movement After the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, anti-slavery reformers went to the South to educate former slaves and supervise their work as free laborers. Women reformers often clashed with male government officials... After the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, anti-slavery reformers went to the South to educate former slaves and supervise their work as free laborers. Women reformers often clashed with male government officials of the Freedmen’s Burueau who administered federal government programs for freedpeople. Show more Show less 1861 3