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Abarinda nibarwana (Field Card)
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The people who protect this country are away fighting.' This refers to old tribal fighting before the Europeans came and stopped it all, i.e. before 1890.
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Ada a Banda
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"My father, Banda, has gone off to work in the towns, for a long long time, to buy himself clothes." how true a reflection this is upon thousands of Tonga men in this district who go off to mines and towns for their own reasons leaving the women and children to fend for themselves at home. Many send back money, bu...
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Adamu, we = Adam, you have left me
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The theme of migrant labour, of the men working far away in S. Rhodesia, N. Rhodesia or in South Africa is a constant one among the women who have been left behind. "Adamu we, aye aye! Koto wo Wandisiya maule aye, wo aye aye! Ine ndi kulila, aye aye wo!" "Adam a-ye-a-ye. You have left me. I am crying -- I will tak...
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Ahe likalakati = The usurpers
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The four leading women sang this song on their knees, and the principal singer also mimed the torso, hip and arm movements of the dance whilst she sang.
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Ajuba
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An attractive dance by young soldiers whose tribe has the local reputation of being amongst the most hamdsome in the Congo. Their home district is at the most northerly part of the great bend in the Congo river where it is already several miles wide. (Copied from disc)
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Alaina n’kuphika nkhwani
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This kind of dance, they say, was first introduced into the district by Yao people, about 15 years ago, 1940, when it was originally sung in the Yao language, from the Fort Johnstone District. But the Chewa girls liked the dance and made up their own words for it. They reflect the young girls growing sense of resp...
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Alume yerani malo (Field Card)
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The singer calls to those behind to hurry and catch up with the dance team as they are going to a big dance competition. This item is a fascinating example of the authentic 2 against 3 African cross rhythm.
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Amai, ami, ndikunene eleli
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"Mother, mother I will say much to you You have taken my child. I myself am only small You have taken my child. No, you have taken my child, as I say."
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Ambila baBemba na baLamba (Field Card)
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The Chisanzhi Mbira is the traditional type of the district: The basket rattle is a well-made woven article with a handle; the rattles had wooden handles and an open work basket head with beer bottle tops inside. The bottle is a common percussion instrument among the Lulua and the singing gourd is the favorite ins...
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Angozo
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Who Angozo might have been and what he had done could not be explained, but the song was, no doubt, founded on fact, and the singing of this song would ensure publicity. "Angoza, ine ee ee, umerewo ndimwano Ambani ee-ee-ee-ee! Simudziwa mbodola ansani ee-ee!" "Angozo (man's name) you are very indiscreet. You have...
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